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A stroll down memory lane... in 1950s Wolverhampton

By Black Country Bugle  |  Posted: March 22, 2014

By Dan Shaw

  • Queen Square

  • The Civic Hall and Town Hall

  • Darlington Street

  • Dudley Street

  • Victoria Street

  • The "Lindy Lou" in Victoria Street

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THOUSANDS of shoppers visit the busy centre of Wolverhampton every day but do you remember how things looked back in the 1950s?

We can turn the clock back with these 60-year-old picture postcards from the collection of Arthur Gunter of Merry Hill, Wolverhampton.

At the top left we have an evocative picture of Queen Square. Perhaps the most notable feature are the crisscrossing overhead wires that powered the trolleybuses.

Wolverhampton's trolleybus service began operating in October 1923, replacing the town's electric trams service, and for a brief period in the 1930s it was the largest trolleybus network in the world. After the Second World War transport policy changed and the last Wolverhampton trolleybus ran on 5 March, 1967.

Our picture at top right shows the Civic Hall and next to it the Town Hall. The Civic Hall opened in May 1938 and the first concert was given by the Old Royals Association, with soloists Anne Ziegler and Webster Booth. Over the years the likes of Paul Robeson, Yehudi Menuhin, David Bowie, Morrisey, Queen, Tommy Steele, Slade, the Kinks and Blur have all played there.

Another of a our pictures features one of Wolverhampton's best-known landmarks – the "Lindy Lou" in Victoria Street. The timber-framed house dates from the early 1600s – the date "1300" on the front is believed to be a Victorian exaggeration. The name Lindy Lou is recent and comes from when the building was a toy shop in the 1950s.

Have these pictures brought back memories of old Wolverhampton? Please contact editor@blackcountry bugle.co.uk or write in.

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